Welcome back!
During this break, various things have happened, but I’d say that the main is I graduated.
To resume the work of the blog, it seems the case, after several requests, post here some logos of NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura available to those bloggers who want to put a in their home page.
Above you can see thumbnails of the two versions, black and white. Please note that they are both .png, with transparent background (the white and the black backgrounds that you see here are only to highlight the text, will not find them in the file where I’m addressing you to).
Here is the code to insert into your blog / website. It already has links to the Facebook group. Simply copy the code and place it in your sidebar (or wherever you like) within a generic widget.
I’ve made ​​it in three sizes. To get an idea of their proportions, keep in mind that the preview that you see on the beginning of the post are about 200 pixels wide.

 

BLACK VERSION:

Large (300×250 pixel):
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_191424117536163&ap=1"><img src="http://img835.imageshack.us/img835/989/grandenero.png" alt="NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura" /></a>

Medium (180×150 pixel):
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_191424117536163&ap=1"><img src="http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/4595/medionero.png" alt="NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura" /></a>

Small (120×90 pixel):
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_191424117536163&ap=1"><img src="http://img832.imageshack.us/img832/2959/piccolonero.png" alt="NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura" /></a>

 

WHITE VERSION:

Large (300×250 pixel):
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_191424117536163&ap=1"><img src="http://img862.imageshack.us/img862/7420/grandebianco.png" alt="NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura" /></a>

Medium (180×150 pixel):
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_191424117536163&ap=1"><img src="http://img651.imageshack.us/img651/2245/mediobianco.png" alt="NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura" /></a>

Small (120×90 pixel):
<a href="http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_191424117536163&ap=1"><img src="http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/1742/piccolobianco.png" alt="NIBA | Network Italiano Blog di Architettura" /></a>

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«Un imprevisto
è la sola speranza»
(E. M.)

Tuesday, February 8th in Milan there will be the second episode of the Critical Futures debate, which took place last month in London. I’ve been talking about it here. Here are abstracts and participants:

Critical Futures #2

A debate on the future of architecture criticism. Tuesday, February 8, at the Design Library

Over the past decade, epochal transformations have profoundly reshaped the context within which architecture is conceived and debated. The Internet has made images and information free and instantly ubiquitous; magazines, once the undisputed platforms for the criticism of architecture and design, have been challenged to redefine their purpose and economic model in the light of dwindling readerships; blogs have given a global audience, potentially of millions, to anyone with an Internet connection. In all of this, architecture criticism in the traditional sense appears to have all but vanished – not only from the Internet but from magazines themselves. As Peter Kelly, editor of Blueprint, wrote in a recent editorial, “As traditional publishing media and institutions become less influential, one wonders where architects can go to find informed, intelligent criticism of their work”.

How will the practice of architecture in Italy, a country whose architectural history is inextricably linked to that of its great magazines, evolve in response to the proliferation of open, autonomous and free networks of online debate? Are architects today really in search of “informed, intelligent criticism” of their work, or is the architecture critic to be considered instead an anachronism? Is, as Kelly writes, a more realistic and rigorous approach to architectural criticism online urgently needed? In the second of a three-part series of debates on the future of architecture criticism organized by Domus in London, Milan and New York to celebrate the launch of its new website, this discussion will bring together writers, editors, bloggers and theorists active in the field today to address these and other questions.

The event will be followed by complimentary drinks and music organised by domus.

Streaming live at www.domusweb.it

Participants:
Salvatore d’Agostino – author of the blog Wilfing Architettura
Rossella Ferorelli – blogger and founder of Network italiano blog d’architettura [yes, that’s it!]
Fabrizio Gallanti – abitare.it
Marco de Michelis – criticist and historician
Elisa Poli – researcher
Luca Molinari, critic and curator
Luca Diffuse, architect and blogger
Moderated by Joseph Grima – Domus

Tuesday, february 8 2011, 7 p.m.
Design Library
Via Savona,11
Milano
Free entrance

I invite everyone to follow the live streaming. I hope this time they’ll make it possible to intervene via email or chat: it would definitely be the right choice.

Yuppeee!

From the Nest to the NIBA!

January 26, 2011

As you can see, now in my sidebar on the right stands a new logo, designed by Daniele Mantellato: that of Niba | Network Italiano dei Blog di Architettura (Italian Network of Architecture Blogs).

It is basically a Facebook group created by me with this description:

Dear architecture bloggers, blog readers or fans of architecture,
Most of you will have realized that blogs and Facebook are very different instruments, for good and bad.
We love blogs to leave us the freedom to give them our preferred shape.
We love Facebook because of the ease we keep in touch with, and because its allow us to share content.
We have created this group with the intention of making a blog connector out of it, in order to help Italian (or not) architecture bloggers to stay better updated on their activities. We only ask to give it visibility and share content: in particular, notes and links to your posts are welcome.

My idea, therefore, was to create a simple «network in the network», as Alessandro Rocca (Low Cost Low Tech) has aptly called it. But, as I hoped, in short, the room was filled with faces and words, and a week after all we are already 97.

Perhaps the Italian blogosphere is not as deserted as it seems, since many quite heated discussions have already born in the group. Anyone interested is invited to join and participate!

Here we are (hopefully) all:

Eccoci (spero) tutti:

A Come Architettura
Abitare Mag
Laura Aquili di DES-ART-CHITECTURE
Antonio Marco Alcaro, Giulio Paolo Calcaprina and Giulio Pascali from Amate l’architettura
Francesco Alois from Spirito Architettonico Libero
ArchitectureFeed Architecture Aggregator
Guido Aragona fromBizblog
Andrea Balestrero
Carlo Beltracchi from Beyond the Light Bulb
Claudio Bosio
Marco Brizzi di arch’it
Antonella Bruzzese
Marco Calvani
Silvio Carta from Beyond Icons 2.0
Diego Casartelli
Channelbeta Architectural Review, Gianluigi D’Angelo and Matteo Falcone
Simo Capecchi from In viaggio col taccuino
Maurizio Caudullo from Archinlab
Chvl Associati
Domenico Cogliandro
Comitato Sarzana Che Botta
Luca Coppola
Salvatore D’Agostino from Wilfing Architettura
Gianluigi D’Angelo
Davide Del Giudice
Maurizio Degni from Frustrazioni architettoniche
Roberta Patrizia Di Benigno
Luca Diffuse from Luca Diffuse and Diffuse Outtakes
Domenico Di Siena di Urbanohumano
Davide Di Virgilio
Edilizia E Territorio and Giorgio Santilli
Massimiliano Ercolani from Dokc Lab
Alessio Erioli from Co-de-it
Barbara Falcone from Cibo Architettura
Cristian Farinella and Lorena Greco from Gluemarket
Elena Fedi from Archiportale
Marco Ferrari
Fabio Fornasari from Luoghi sensibili
Annalisa Gentile
Mario Gerosa from Virtual Architectural Heritage
Andrea Graziano from digitag&
Joseph Grima from Domusweb
Luca Guido from Luca Guido
Alberto Iacovoni from ma0 News
Impianti Idrici
Guido Incerti
Jakob Knulp from One to the third
Diego Lama
Matteo Lecis Cocco-Ortu
Enrica Longo
Matteo Lo Prete
Robert Maddalena
Zaira Magliozzi from TheNewArchinTown
Marco Mantellato
Daniele Mantellato
Simona Mazzeo
Ettore Maria Mazzola
Giovanni Mendola from [Identità e Città]
Luca Molinari from ymag
Zoè Chantall Monterubbiano
Renato Nicolini
Edmondo Occhipinti from | edmondo occhipinti architect |
Giorgio Opla and Marco Opla from Opla+
Emanuele Papa from Il blog della cosa
Claudia Pasquero from ecoLogic
Francesco Pecoraro
Emanuele Piccardo from Architettura radicale and archphoto
Paola Pierotti
Emmanuele Jonathan Pilia from PEJA TransArchitecture research
Press/Tfactory and Luigi Prestinenza Puglisi
Paolo Priolo from klat magazine
Pask Rienzo
Alessandro Ranellucci from ArchiBlog
Alessandro Rocca from Low Cost Low Tech
Ugo Rosa from Fiordizucca
Fabrizio Russo
Serena Russo from Petra Dura, architettura e contorni
Antonino Saggio
Giorgio Santilli
Sardarch Architettura
Carmelo Cesare Schillagi
Matteo Seraceni from = Architettura = Ingegneria = Arte =
Luca Silenzi from Spacelab
Diego Terna from l’architettura immaginata
Viviana Terzoli
Traccia Menti
Paolo Valente
Marco Verde from Performative design processes for architecture
Angelo Verderosa
Davide Vizzini

As you can see, the names are many but the links are few. This is because I do not yet know many of you, or I haven’t got the address of your blog, or even I have accidentally skipped someone. I intentionally avoided the study sites with only portfolios, because I believe that the spirit of Niba is clearly more than a mere demonstration of everyone’s work. If I forgot someone or done something wrong, or if you think that the criterion for selecting the link is invalid, comment and I’ll rectify immediately.
Now, what do we expect from this Niba? In truth, I have no idea. This however is part of the game, because I expect surprises.
We’ll see.

Latest activities

October 19, 2010

Here’s a recap of the previous episodes. It was quite an eventful summer.
First, the text Le parole e le cose (words and houses), which can be found in the post below, participated at the third edition of Young Critics Competition, organized by presS/Tfactory_Associazione Italiana di Architettura e Critica [Italian Association of Architecture and Criticism], and on August 27th won the second prize in Venice (some details here) in a side event of the XII Architecture Biennale.

At the award ceremony, under request by the jury, it was also brought a short video that, for the considerable efforts it caused me (voice, text and drawings) and the most patient Massimo Lastrucci (photography) and Daniel Mantellato (videoediting and concept support), I decided to publish here as a witness.
Please forgive in advance the indefensible unpleasentness of my tone of voice, but I did not have anything better then! For the rest, of course it is nothing more than an attempt to lighten a theoretically heavy text – starting with a title made out of a foucaultian pun, which Professor Prestinenza Puglisi liked very much – which otherwise would have been difficult to summarize in a video that is just two minutes long.
Sorry, but I haven’t any English version of it.

Then, we must mention two more episodes of collaboration with Salvatore D’Agostino (Wilfing Architecture).
In the first, I had occasion to put a question to Luca Molinari, curator of the Italian Pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale. Here are the question and answer:

Rossella Ferorelli: During a visit to the Polytechnic University of Bari by Boris Podrecca some time ago, I remembered I an interview the architect gave to Repubblica in May 2006 whose epilogue had frozen me: “Compared to young Italians who are in my atelier, Dutch or Swiss peers have more verve, humor and imagination. Among you there are many little professors, with a few projects but a lot of talk and attendance at exhibitions; they live architecture through magazines, and are not familiar with its issues.” This was the Austrian architect’s opinion, who identified the source of the problem “in the fact of having lost two generations after ’68. You have written books, and you know all about Palladio or Giulio Romano, but not how to put a window.”
I would therefore propose a theoretical reflection on the scope of architecture in general, and particularly in Italy. How is it possible, in fact, that the problem of the general depression of the sector is the one developed by Podrecca, if nor in the field of theoretical research (clearly distinguishing it from the historical one) anything memorable has actually been produced in our country for years?
Personally, I therefore propose you to discuss an interpretation of the problem that sees a resoluting glow in a real hang-up between theory (the theory of “hardware” foundations of philosophy, science and policy that are behind the social function of the architect), and design, and I would like to ask you about which function may still an institution like the Venice Biennale have in the push to solve the architectural of Italy. In particular, as a student, I ask you also to overreach in an academic reflection and to think to the actual and possible relations between universities and the Biennale with the aim of a more continuous and constant striving for future research, not only chasing the lustrous showcases of the various festivals that are in a worrisome trend of multiplication.

Luca Molinari: The problem of the theoretical work in contemporary architecture is serious but perhaps we should change our perspective. Perhaps it is no longer a time of great theoretical narratives, decisive volumes moving thematic centers of gravity, perhaps the karst and fragmented system of contemporary bloggers are changing the way we produce and exchange theory in architecture. Together I believe that the architectural culture should make a different effort and seek, in a world that is radically and dramatically changing words, the incentives and resources for redefining disciplinary boundaries and evidence for theoretical reworking. As for the university I have no problem to say that most of the Italian university system is inadequate to address the current situation and especially to bring within it those vital, viral and critic elements that there is much need for, to a fight cultural stiffening and the syndrome of encirclement that the university must leave behind to survive.

To read all the questions addressed to Molinari on Salvatore’s Blog, click here.

The second collaboration was established by a brief introductory of the [BEYOND THE SENSE OF PLACE] investigation I attended in August 2009. You can find the text here.

Thanks to the kindness of Salvatore D’Agostino, for the secon time The nest very gladly accepts an invitation to participate to a wide-ranging investigation, extended to many (so many!) Italian architecture-and-more bloggers.

This time it was to answer two questions that, apparently trivial, have some spicy implications.

  • What is the well-know architect you appreciate and why?
  • What is the unknown architect  you appreciate and why?

Not to disclose further details, I definitely suggest to read this post and all other of the very interesting series with the emblematic title of [BEYOND THE SENSE OF PLACE].

We point out the interesting post by Salvatore D’agostino entitled Homophilia e nuovi blog [homophilia and new blogs], where this newborn place is mentioned, having I been asked to answer to the question of questions in matter of blogs: why?
I invite you to read it not so much for the answer I gave, as for the variety of blogs presented and the equally varied range of reasons given after that question.
Besides the excellent mcluhanian quote, a further question arises that the many comments give response and a number of additional issues of interest.

Have a good reading.

Contemporary architecture told through negations

Today, I’m starting this new series of posts that will be built with the intent to openly denounce the bad habit, alas widespread in Italy, for which the mass information made on some architectural themes of broad interest is generally entrusted to low competent characters, which, moreover, become spokesmen for absolute rearguard positions, almost always unworthy even from a purely historical point of view.

The problem is particularly virulent, however, because of a contemporary profound crisis of the publishing industry that fails, for some years now, to be a counterpart of sufficient authority and communicativeness to overcome the excessive media power that influence the public opinion through television.
Many have spoken, in recent times, about the cloud that seems to cover, for instance, two historic magazines as Casabella and Domus, in the last editions respectively headed by Francesco from Co and Flavio Albanese. If the former, in fact, has long been rarely able to produce issues consisting in something better than a series of projects of more or less known international studies, the second in general tends to stylish positions closer to applied art; but both suffer from the same inability to implement articles of historical depth, of really current view, of great importance: in a word, actually memorable.

And it is precisely this substantial inability to deeply understand the great changes taking place in society and therefore in urbanism and architecture to give into the hands of persons of dubious aptitude the role of educators of people on the same subjects. Thus, while it is true that we have to be filled with indignation, we cannot be surprised to find Sgarbi or Grillo involved with what, knowingly or not, is a systematic strategy of sabotage of the progress of architectural historical evolution. They have no opponents. [Ahi serva Italia (I can spontaneously occur), how much this situation reminds the democratic disease plaguing my country! The populist Right party is fully comparable with the still ongoing proposition of old models that easily get consensus among the unqualified, while as for the publishing, which party does it take? The one of Left, who loses its place in parliament as a consequence of having been too long far from the real? Or perhaps that of an opposition unqualified itself, scared, silent, vaguely conniving?]

Someone could say that television is not meant to be and actually has never been a source of high-level investigation in any area or topic, and that wishing this happening in architecture just when the crisis is deeper because coming from inside, is foolish if not unlawful. True. But it’s also true that no real information is given if the information, although superficial, isn’t fair at least. For this reason, from the little I can, I will propose these new post as an opposing voice. A reason to think that what was just said in teevee could not be true.

A nest of knots

August 26, 2008

Welcome.

Both if you happened to come here intentionally or casually, this is a new website built with the aim to create a network of knowledge and debate about architecture, whose “knots” we’ll try to untie and whose various destinies we’ll try to prefigure on the basis of inquiries about modernity and much more. To learn more about the intentions of this venture, take a look to the It’s all about section: although confused enough to be contemporary, it will give you an idea of what you can expect from this web journal.

Now, some little explanations about the structure. As you can see, despite this introductive post, some previous articles have already been written: actually they’ve been transferred here from my personal blog, which I’ve been writing about many subjects, among whom architecture (even if in general), until this moment. Then, it can be said that the real activity of The nest and the spider web starts today.

More: I have to previously apologize for my bold attempt to manage such a blog despite my awareness of writing an uncertain English. I am Italian indeed, and English is of course a second language for me. For this reason, please feel free to correct (both publicly or privately) all the mistakes I’m inexorably going to make: any suggestions will be very appreciated.

Of course, you can also read this website in the original language.

I hope that you’ll be interested in the subjects we’ll deal with and that this causes stimulating debates and an exchange of contributes. Building a spider web is not simple, but I trust in the help of many.

Have a good trip and keep in touch!

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